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History of King Asoka

Sunday 6 December 2009

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ASOKA or ASHOKA
KING and EMPEROR

EMPEROR ASHOKA
273 - 232 BC

In the history of the world there have been thousands of kings and emperors who called themselves ‘Their Highnesses’, ‘Their Majesties’ and ‘Their Exalted Majesties’ and so on. They shone for a brief moment, and as quickly disappeared. But Ashoka shines and shines brightly like a bright star, even unto this day. So wrote H.G. Wells, British historian and noble seeker of the truth about mankind’s tumultuous past.

Questionable Hereditary Succession
Ashoka was anointed the new emperor or ruler of the Mauryan Empire in 274 BCE. His grandfather, Chandragupta, had set out to conquer the weaker surrounding kingdoms to expand the territory of his people in 324 BCE, and was the first to rule over a unified India. Ashoka’s father, Bindusara, established a reign much the same as his father’s, controlling a larger kingdom than ever before known. When Bindusara became gravely ill, Ashoka succeeded him, although one hundred of his other brothers were mysteriously murdered. Many historians believe Ashoka had his own brothers eliminated so that he could succeed his father.

A Sudden Change of Heart
Ashoka’s reign as emperor began with a series of wars and bloodshed, culminating in the Kalinga War of 260 BC. The mammoth loss of life and suffering witnessed on the battlefield made him turn away from war. He subsequently became deeply influenced by Buddhism, and adopted the dharma, which consists of basic virtuous teachings that can be practiced by all men regardless of social origins. "Dharma" is derived from the Sanskrit word for "duty".

Towards a New Imperial Unity
Ashoka saw the dharma as a righteous path showing the utmost respect for all living things. The dharma would bring harmony and unity to India in the form of much needed compassion. Serving as a guiding light, a voice of conscious that is the dharma can lead one to be a respectful and highly responsible human being. Edward D’cruz interprets the Ashokan dharma as a "religion to be used as a symbol of a new imperial unity and a cementing force to weld the diverse and heterogeneous elements of the empire". Ashoka’s intent was to instigate "a practice of social behavior so broad and benevolent in its scope, that no person, no matter what his religion, could reasonably object to it".

The Moral Order of Dharma
Ashoka’s dream was to unify a nation so large that its people of one region shared little in common with those of another region. Diversity of religion, ethnicity and many cultural aspects held citizens against each other, creating social barriers. The moral order of dharma could be agreed upon as beneficial and progressive by all who could understand its merits; in fact, the dharma had long been a primary practice for members of Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism. Dharma became the link between king and commoner; everyone lived by the same law of moral, religious and civil obligations towards others.

Pillars of the Earth
The reign of Ashoka Mauryan could easily have disappeared into history as the ages passed by, and would have, if hadn’t he left behind a record of his trials. The testimony of this wise king was discovered in the form of magnificently sculpted pillars and boulders with the various actions and teachings he wished to be published etched into the stone. What Ashoka left behind was the first written language in India since the ancient city of Harrapa. Rather than Sanskrit, the language used for inscription was the current spoken form called Prakrita. In translating these monuments, historians learn the bulk of what is assumed to have been true fact of the Mauryan Empire. It is difficult to determine whether or not some actual events ever happened, but the stone etchings clearly depict how Ashoka wanted to be thought of and remembered.

The Emperor’s New Edicts
King Ashoka, the third monarch of the Indian Mauryan dynasty, has come to be regarded as one of the most exemplary rulers in world history. Although Buddhist literature preserved the legend of this ruler - the story of a cruel and ruthless king who converted to Buddhism and thereafter established a reign of virtue - definitive historical records of his reign were lacking. Then in the nineteenth century there came to light a large number of edicts, in India, Nepal, Pakistan and Afghanistan. These edicts, inscribed on rocks and pillars, proclaim Asoka’s reforms and policies and promulgate his advice to his subjects. The present rendering of these edicts, based on earlier translations, offers us insights into a powerful and capable ruler’s attempt to establish an empire on the foundation of righteousness, a reign which makes the moral and spiritual welfare of his subjects its primary concern.

Beyond Greed, Hatred and Delusion
We have no way of knowing how effective Ashoka’s reforms were or how long they lasted, but we do know that monarchs throughout the ancient Buddhist world were encouraged to look to his style of good government as an ideal to be venerated and kindredly administered. King Ashoka undoubtedly has to be credited with the first serious attempt to develop a Buddhist polity. Today, with widespread disillusionment in prevailing ideologies, and the search for a political philosophy that goes beyond greed (capitalism), hatred (communism) and delusion (dictatorships led by "infallible" leaders), Asoka’s edicts may still make a meaningful contribution to the development of a more spiritually-based political system of good government for every nation on earth.

A Well Respected Man
Emperor Ashoka was a cruel and merciless ruler at first. He waged war on his perceived enemies on a whim, and caused much suffering amongst his own people. While observing a massive slaughter at the front lines of his army, he experienced a change of heart and turned to the welfare of his own people, who still justly feared him as a ruthless and highly oppressive tyrant. Somewhere along the way he had become a Buddhist, and as a result taught and persuaded his people to love and respect all living things. He insisted on the recognition of the sanctity of all human life. The horrors of war have often transformed savage hearts into compassionate ones. Even the unnecessary slaughter or mutilation of animals was immediately abolished. Wildlife became protected by the king’s law against sport hunting and branding. Limited hunting was permitted for consumption reasons but the overwhelming majority of Indians chose by their own free will to become vegetarians. Ashoka also showed mercy to those imprisoned, allowing them leave for the outside a day of the year. He attempted to raise the professional ambition of the common man by building universities for study and water transit and irrigation systems for trade and agriculture. He treated his subjects as equals regardless of their religion, politics and cast. The kingdoms surrounding his, so easily overthrown, were instead made to be well-respected allies.

In His Own Words
All men are my children. I am like a father to them. As every father desires the good and the happiness of his children, I wish that all men should be happy always.

Coda
During his reign, Ashoka became an avid Buddhist practitioner, building 84,000 stupas across his empire to house the sacred relics of the Lord Buddha. He sent his family on religious pilgrimages to foreign places, and staged massive assemblies so holy men from the world over could converse upon the philosophies of the day. More than even Buddhism was Ashoka’s deep involvement in the dharma. The dharma became the ultimate expression of the moral and ethical standards he desired his subjects to live by. Ashoka defined the main principles of dharma (dhamma) as nonviolence, tolerance of all sects and opinions, obedience to parents, respect for the Brahmans and other religious teachers and priests, liberality towards friends, humane treatment of servants, and generosity towards all. These principles suggest a general ethic of behaviour to which no religious or social group could object.

Rock On
In perhaps a fitting tribute to this great man of vision and unity, the Indian government has adopted the famous lion capital from his pillar at Sarnath as its official national emblem. The wheel design on the capital’s base has also become the central figure of the nation’s flag. May the wheel keep on turning for the sake of all men who are brothers in this brave new millennium of ours, and may the teachings of the Light of Asia continue to reach every corner of the earth despite what some inferior men may do or say.

- Source : blogs.ibibo.com

Ashoka - Buddhist Conversion

As the legend goes, one day after the war was over, Ashoka ventured out to roam the city and all he could see were burnt houses and scattered corpses. This sight made him sick and he cried the famous quote, "What have I done?" The brutality of the conquest led him to adopt Buddhism and he used his position to propagate the relatively new philosophy to new heights, as far as ancient Rome and Egypt. He made Vibhajyavada Buddhism his state religion around 260 BC. He propagated the Vibhajyavada school of Buddhism and preached it within his domain and worldwide from about 250 BC. Emperor Ashoka undoubtedly has to be credited with the first serious attempt to develop a Buddhist polity.

Prominent in this cause were his son Venerable Mahinda and daughter Sanghamitta (whose name means "friend of the Sangha"), who established Buddhism in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). He built thousands of Stupas and Viharas for Buddhist followers. The Stupas of Sanchi are world famous and the stupa named Sanchi Stupa was built by Emperor Ashoka.

During the remaining portion of Ashoka’s reign, he pursued an official policy of nonviolence, ahimsa. Even the unnecessary slaughter or mutilation of animals was immediately abolished. Wildlife became protected by the king’s law against sport hunting and branding. Limited hunting was permitted for consumption reasons but Ashoka also promoted the concept of vegetarianism. Ashoka also showed mercy to those imprisoned, allowing them leave for the outside a day of the year.

He attempted to raise the professional ambition of the common man by building universities for study and water transit and irrigation systems for trade and agriculture. He treated his subjects as equals regardless of their religion, politics and caste. The kingdoms surrounding his, so easily overthrown, were instead made to be well-respected allies. He is acclaimed for constructing hospitals for animals and renovating major roads throughout India. After this transformation of self, Ashoka came to be known as Dhammashoka (Sanskrit), meaning Ashoka, the follower of Dharma. Ashoka defined the main principles of dharma (dhamma) as nonviolence, tolerance of all sects and opinions, obedience to parents, respect for the Brahmans and other religious teachers and priests, liberality towards friends, humane treatment of servants, and generosity towards all. These principles suggest a general ethic of behaviour to which no religious or social group could object.

Some critics say that Ashoka was afraid of more wars, but among his neighbors, including the Seleucid Empire and the Greco-Bactrian kingdom established by Diodotus I, none could match his strength. He was a contemporary of both Antiochus I Soter and his successor Antiochus II Theos of the Seleucid dynasty as well as Diodotus I and his son Diodotus II of the Greco-Bactrian kingdom. If his inscriptions and edicts are well studied, one finds that he was familiar with the Hellenic world but never in awe of it. His edicts, which talk of friendly relations, give the names of both Antiochus of the Seleucid empire and Ptolemy III of Egypt. But the fame of the Mauryan empire was widespread from the time that Ashoka’s grandfather Chandragupta Maurya defeated Seleucus Nicator , the founder of the Seleucid Dynasty.

The source of much of our knowledge of Ashoka is the many inscriptions he had carved on pillars and rocks throughout the empire. Emperor Ashoka is known as Piyadasi (in Pali) or Priyadarshi (in Sanskrit) meaning "good looking" or "favoured by the gods with good blessing". All his inscriptions have the imperial touch and show compassionate loving; he addressed his people as his "children". These inscriptions promoted Buddhist morality and encouraged nonviolence and adherence to Dharma (duty or proper behavior), and they talk of his fame and conquered lands as well as the neighbouring kingdoms holding up his might. One also gets some primary information about the Kalinga War and Ashoka’s allies plus some useful knowlege on the civil admisistration. The Ashoka Pillar at Sarnath is the most popular of the relics left by Ashoka. Made of sandstone, this pillar records the visit of the emperor to Sarnath, in the 3rd century BC. It has a four-lion capital (four lions standing back to back) which was adopted as the emblem of the modern Indian republic. The lion symbolises both Ashoka’s imperial rule and the kingship of the Buddha. In translating these monuments, historians learn the bulk of what is assumed to have been true fact of the Mauryan Empire. It is difficult to determine whether or not some actual events ever happened, but the stone etchings clearly depict how Ashoka wanted to be thought of and remembered.

Ashoka’s own words as known from his Edicts are: "All men are my children. I am like a father to them. As every father desires the good and the happiness of his children, I wish that all men should be happy always." Edward D’Cruz interprets the Ashokan dharma as a "religion to be used as a symbol of a new imperial unity and a cementing force to weld the diverse and heterogeneous elements of the empire".

At the time of Emperor Ashoka (270-232 BC), according to his Edicts.

Also, in the Edicts of Ashoka, Ashoka mentions the Hellenistic kings of the period as a convert to Buddhist, although no Hellenic historical record of this event remain:

The conquest by Dharma has been won here, on the borders, and even six hundred yojanas (5,400-9,600 km) away, where the Greek king Antiochos rules, beyond there where the four kings named Ptolemy, Antigonos, Magas and Alexander rule, likewise in the south among the Cholas, the Pandyas, and as far as Tamraparni (Sri Lanka).

Ashoka also claims that he encouraged the development of herbal medicine, for human and nonhuman animals, in their territories:

  • Everywhere within Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi’s [Ashoka’s] domain, and among the people beyond the borders, the Cholas, the Pandyas, the Satiyaputras, the Keralaputras, as far as Tamraparni and where the Greek king Antiochos rules, and among the kings who are neighbors of Antiochos, everywhere has Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, made provision for two types of medical treatment: medical treatment for humans and medical treatment for animals. Wherever medical herbs suitable for humans or animals are not available, I have had them imported and grown. Wherever medical roots or fruits are not available I have had them imported and grown. Along roads I have had wells dug and trees planted for the benefit of humans and animals.
    • Ashoka the Great, Edicts of Ashoka, Rock Edict 2

The Greeks in India even seem to have played an active role in the propagation of Buddhism, as some of the emissaries of Ashoka, such as Dharmaraksita, are described in Pali sources as leading Greek ("Yona") Buddhist monks, active in spreading Buddhism (the Mahavamsa, XII).




P.S.

King Ashoka

Ashoka ("He who is the beloved of the Gods and who regards everyone amiably") and Dhamma (304 BCE – 232 BCE) was an Indian emperor, of the Maurya Dynasty who ruled from 273 BCE to 232 BCE. Often cited as one of India’s greatest emperors, Ashoka reigned over most of present-day India after a number of military conquests. His empire stretched from present-day Pakistan, Afghanistan and parts of Iran in the west, to the present-day Bangladesh and Assam states of India in the east, and as far south as the Tamil Nadu. His reign was headquartered in Magadha (present-day Bihar state of India). He embraced Buddhism from the prevalent Vedic tradition after witnessing the mass deaths of the war of Kalinga, which he himself had waged out of a desire for conquest. He was later dedicated in the propagation of Buddhism across Asia and established monuments marking several significant sites in the life of Gautama Buddha.Ashoka in human history is often referred as the emperor of all ages.Ashoka was a devotee to ahimsa(nonviolence) ,love , truth ,tolerance and Vegetarianism .

His name "aśoka" means "without sorrow" in Sanskrit (a= no, soka= sorrow or worry). In his edicts, he is referred to as Devānāmpriya (Devanāgarī: देवानांप्रिय)/Devānaṃpiya or "The Beloved Of The Gods", and Priyadarśin (Devanāgarī: प्रियदर्शी)/Piyadassī or "He who regards everyone amiably,".

Renowned British author and social critic H. G. Wells in his bestselling two-volume work, The Outline of History (1920),wrote of emperor Ashoka: In the history of the world there have been thousands of kings and emperors who called themselves ’their highnesses,’ ’their majesties,’ and ’their exalted majesties’ and so on. They shone for a brief moment, and as quickly disappeared. But Ashoka shines and shines brightly like a bright star, even unto this day.

Along with the Edicts of Ashoka, his legend is related in the later 2nd century Aśokāvadāna ("Narrative of Asoka") and Divyāvadāna ("Divine narrative"), and in the Sinhalese text Mahavamsa ("Great Chronicle"). Although there are many inscriptions of Ashoka, no coins which can be confidently linked to him have been found. This may be linked to the fact that his contemporary and neighbour Diodotus I has numerous coins but no inscriptions. Moreover, the Kandahar bilingual inscription clearly indicates that Ashoka was the ruler of this area but the coins point to Diodotus-I as the ruler. Dr. Ranajit Pal attempts to resolve the problem by suggesting that Ashoka was the same as Diodotus I. He maintains that Patali near Kohnouj and Konarak in the Gulf Area was Patliputra.

After two thousand years , the influence of Ashoka is seen in the south asia especially Indian subcontinent.An emblem which was excavated from his empire is today the national Emblem of India.

Wikipedia


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8 Forum messages

  • History of King Asoka 4 November 2010 01:12

    This Essay seriously rocked. Way easy to understand and interesting. I loved it!!! <3

    Reply to this message

  • History of King Asoka 21 September 2011 02:29, by Hendon Harris

    In early January 2010 I was excited because I had located a very large geoglyph in Colorado that prominently displayed the head of a man with a braided beard. It was obviously an image of a powerful well respected man or why else would anyone have built such a tribute? At the time the only image of a man with a braided beard that would command that kind of respect was Sargon, King of Akkadia. However, there was not then nor is there now any evidence to link him to N. America. So you can imagine my surprise today after working for months to prove what most consider to be "the legend" of Hwui Shan’s missionary expedition to Fu-Sang (North America) correct that I stumbled across a page showing the very few supposed images of King Ashoka and one of the two types showed a mature king with a braided beard. If you hear a lion’s roar then expect a lion to be in the vicinity. If you are researching huge rock carving projects then research religions and civilizations that are known for this activity over a very long period of time. I should have known better. Its common sense. This connection that I’ve made today does not make it true. It may not be an image of the head of Emperor Ashoka. But its an interesting first step and I believe its worthy of followup. Google: "akkadian king geoglyph" While you’re at it Google: "stupa rock utah" and "Buddha tree of life lotus flower colorado geoglyphs" which are about 25 miles away from Church Rock, Utah. Very close to both of these is what I believe is an ancient "Lion of Asoka" off center on a pillar of rock. Google: "Queen Nefertiti Rock in Arches NP" I know this is a lot to swallow but did those genius Buddhist missionary monks from India make it to North America? I believe they did and I believe the custom from India of the Seven Step/ Seven Vow Wedding Ceremony walked clockwise around the sacred flame practiced today by numerous Native American tribes all over North America is proof that they came and taught Native Americans not only their religions but their customs and technology as well.

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  • History of King Asoka 4 May 2012 10:33, by AYUSH VASHISHTHA

    agar king ashok budhism ki jagah par hindu dharma ka prachar prasar karte to aj china me ade hindu hote.kyoki aj china me ade log bodh dharma ko mante h. ’’ASHOK WAS A JAT AND HINDU.I LOVE BUDHISM VERY MUCH AND MUCH BUT THE MEANS OF BUDHISM IS PEACE BUT SOMEONE WHO NOT WANT PEACE BUT WORLD ONLY KNOW THE POWER. ASHOK STOPED HIS POWER OF SOLDIER AND HE DOING IN THE WORLD BUDHISM WORK.AT LAST THIS IS NOT FAIR THE POWER OF HINDUS NOT VERY STRONG IN THIS WAY SO YOU SEEN THE SITUATION OF INDIA IN NOW.’’ GO TO MY ID WWW.17AYUSHVASHISHTHA17.COM@...

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  • History of King Asoka 17 May 2012 03:25, by ashok Chowla

    What was the language spoken and those in which the edicts or scirptures were written

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  • History of King Asoka 11 December 2012 11:09

    can i get info of wives of ashoka and his children??

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